Shaded Houston big horn avoiding heat exhaustion
Stay in the shade to avoid the blistering heat like this big horn at the Houston Zoo - By Mike Fisher
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Houston Heat Safety Resources to Help Keep Cool This Summer

As triple-digit heat and humidity send the heat index soaring, extreme temperatures can put a damper on your summer activities. Since we can’t change the weather in Houston, taking some simple precautions can keep the summer fun going safely. From keeping your home and pets cool to avoiding heat stroke, these Houston heat safety tips can help you make the most of these long summer days.

Photo by By Rolexcashflow, via Wikimedia Commons
Photo by By Rolexcashflow, via Wikimedia Commons CC BY 3.0

Prevent heat-related illness: Drink plenty of water or electrolyte-replacement beverages when working or playing outside, and avoid caffeine, alcohol and sugar.

The Houston Fire Department knows a thing or two about Houston heat safety. Their website features a plethora of information on staying safe when the heat index spikes. From pool safety to hydration tips, this information from the pros can help you beat the heat in summer.

Keep your yard healthy: Water in the morning or evening, avoiding the harsh midday heat.

As the weather in Houston gets hotter, our yards can take a beating. Extreme temperatures can wilt or damage even the hardiest plants. Local real estate blog ActiveRain.com offers excellent advice on keeping your plants healthy, including appropriate summer watering schedules and the scoop on the best times to start and transplant plants during Houston’s long growing season.

jumping_dog.jpg
By Adam Baker, via Wikimedia Commons CC BY 2.0

Give pets shelter: If your furry friend lives outdoors, make sure it has access to shade or shelter and plenty of cool, fresh water.

The Houston summer heat isn’t just unpleasant for humans – it can bother pooches and other pets, too. The Houston SPCA provides a list of essential heat safety tips, along with an informative video, to help keep our furry friends safe and comfortable.

Seal up your home: Seal around doors and windows with high-quality caulk to keep cool air in and hot air out.

The triple-digit heat can make your air-conditioning unit work overtime. Click2Houston.com says simple precautions, such as replacing worn door sweeps, can help keep your home pleasant and boost energy efficiency.

Know the warning signs: A person with heat exhaustion may have clammy, pale skin, headache, cramps or nausea.

Do you know the signs of heat stroke? Or, how to respond in the event of heat exhaustion or other summer heat illness? The answers to these important questions and more can be found on M.D. Anderson Hospital’s website, along with tips for avoiding and responding to the health threats posed by extreme temperatures.

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