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No Snow, No Santa? Help Kids Adjust to a New Climate.

Moving to a new town, city, or state can be difficult for anyone, especially children. One of the toughest adjustments can be moving from a region that traditionally sees cold weather and snow during the holiday season to an area that likely won’t offer a ‘white Christmas.’ Not surprisingly, making the transition from warm climate to cold can be equally challenging. Help prepare your kids for the new environment by following these tips:

Not Too Hot, Not Too Cold

It’s bad enough if you forget to go shopping for lunch ingredients and have to pack a meal of black olives and stale tortilla chips for your kid. (I’m speaking from personal experience here). But when it comes to forgetting to provide proper clothing for the climate you’re in, it can get downright dangerous.

Temperature-specific clothing is especially important, but don’t forget to consider factors such as mud, wind, and moisture. Even after your kids reach that age when it’s “cool” to go to school in the middle of the winter in shorts, it’s still worthwhile to try and establish good habits.

Wearing the right clothes becomes especially tricky in the fall, when temperatures can swing wildly; keep this in mind when buying or making Halloween costumes. Few kids want to have to wear jackets over their awesome superhero get-up, or shed a mask and cape because of excessive heat.

The Call of the Wild(life)

Chances are good that a move will introduce you to a whole new ecosystem of flora and fauna, possibly not limited to the exterior of your house. Stink bugs, Japanese beetles, fire ants and more will make an appearance depending on your location. Kids might love to study insects, but they probably won’t like waking up to them crawling around in their beds. Preparing for these eventualities by performing maintenance and checking to see what’s covered under our homeowner’s insurance will make everyone sleep better at night.

Tis’ the Season for Snow (or Not)

If you’re moving from a place that gets a lot of snow to one that doesn’t get any, you’re going to need to find a creative way to break the news to your little ones that there will be no white Christmas. Kids used to snow don’t take kindly to jokes about Santa having to ride in on a golf cart because the reindeer can’t pull the sleigh, or that they’re going to have to decorate a palm instead of a pine. Lessen the culture shock to your kids by sticking to tradition as much as possible.

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire

Your kids might be itching to have fire in the house for the first time, but don’t let their excitement overcome your cautiousness in checking out the system thoroughly before you light the first match; just because a fireplace looks great doesn’t mean it’s been set up or maintained properly. Having wood heat can also affect your homeowner’s insurance premiums, which is something to keep in mind before you set the logs cheerily ablaze.

Enjoying the Great Outdoors

Moving to a place with a different climate can be a great jumping-off point for enjoying the outdoors in new ways with your kids. Just keep in mind that all activities have their own unique hazards. Kids who are used to being pasty-pale for nine months out of the year will definitely need to be slathered in suntan lotion before you let them spend all of Thanksgiving catching the football on a gorgeously warm November day. Snowsports such as sledding and cross-country skiing seem easy enough, but do require a certain level of climate-specific knowledge.

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No Snow, No Santa? Help Kids Adjust to a New Climate. Moving to a new town, city, or state can be difficult for anyone, especially children. One of the toughest adjustments can be moving from a region that traditionally sees cold weather and snow during the holiday season to an area that likely won’t offer a ‘white Christmas.’ Not surprisingly, making… http://blog.allstate.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/202b3f8bff72fd3e8ca212d7c884c13b.jpg Allstate No Snow, No Santa? Help Kids Adjust to a New Climate.