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The Allstate Blog | Everyday Peace of Mind

There’s a Squirrel in the House — Now What?

Innocent and playful might be words you associate with squirrels. But just as these critters can be cute, they can also be a menace. Although these animals may not appear to cause too much trouble, squirrel-related incidents can arise. Here are a few squirrel situations and solutions to the problems they can cause,… Allstate https://i2.wp.com/blog.allstate.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/91383860.jpg?fit=2290%2C1527&ssl=1
There’s a Squirrel in the House — Now What?
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Innocent and playful might be words you associate with squirrels. But just as these critters can be cute, they can also be a menace.

Although these animals may not appear to cause too much trouble, squirrel-related incidents can arise.

Here are a few squirrel situations and solutions to the problems they can cause, according to The Humane Society of the United States.

Situation #1: How Did you Get in Here?

Panic may set in when you realize that a squirrel has gotten into your house. Here are three ways you can respond.

  • Clear the room of all things that stand in the way of getting the squirrel out, including pets and children. Open all windows and doors in the room the squirrel is in and give it time to try to escape.
  • You will need heavy gloves and a large blanket. After putting on the gloves to protect your hands, head toward the squirrel while holding the blanket in front of you to conceal your approach. Drop the blanket on the squirrel while and apply light pressure over the squirrel to keep it in place. Wrap the squirrel in the blanket, gently carry it out of the house and release the squirrel when you are away from a point of entry.
  • Buy a trap to catch the squirrel after you confine it to one area of your home. Place peanut butter in the trap to lure the squirrel. If you capture the squirrel in the trap, bring it outside and release it.

Situation #2: Am I Crazy, Or Am I Really Hearing That? 

If you’re hearing noises coming from your attic or chimney, it’s possible that a squirrel — or a squirrel family — has moved in. That is especially likely if you’re hearing noises between February and May or August through October, because those are the months when squirrels are nesting and having babies.

If you find a squirrel nest without babies in it, you can try to scare the squirrel out of the attic or chimney by making loud noises with music and pots and pans. If that doesn’t work, you can leave out rags soaked in cider vinegar which deters squirrels. Try to determine how the squirrel got in, so that later on you can close that point of entry.

If the nest does have babies in it, leave the removal to the professionals. Squirrels go to great lengths to protect their babies and may be determined to reenter your home if their litter is still inside. Also, baby squirrels don’t survive long without their mothers.

It may be a good idea to get your electrical wires checked out if you find yourself in one of the situations above. Squirrels may chew on electrical wires, and exposed wires could potentially lead to a fire. So, be proactive and get your home professionally inspected.

Situation #3: Bye, Bye Bulbs

Are you questioning where your tulips and crocuses have gone? They may have been a meal for a hungry squirrel. So, when planting, consider being proactive and soaking your bulbs in squirrel repellent prior to putting them in the ground. Repellent can help keep your plants safe from squirrels without damaging the bulbs. Another option is to plant daffodils, which squirrels typically will not eat.

Although squirrels may appear to be innocent in nature, they can turn into a problem in a blink of an eye. If a squirrel invades your property, these tips may help you resolve the problem.